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Law Review Guide to the Mendik Library

Covid-19 - General Information

Because of the pandemic, many of the resources discussed in this guide are currently either unavailable or greatly limited.

If you have any questions, please contact Michael McCarthy, Head of Reference Services and Professor of Legal Research.

 

New York Public Library: A Great Resource (Especially Now)

If you cannot find something in the Mendik Library, a good next step would be the the New York Public Library.

While the NYPL remains closed to visitors, it has greatly increased the number of electronic databases which can be accessed from off-site.  

Access is limited, however, to individuals who have a NYPL library card (which can be gotten by an individual who lives, works or goes to school in NYC).

NYPL Electronic Databases:  https://www.nypl.org/about/remote-research-resources

Getting a NYPL Library Card: https://www.nypl.org/help/library-card#apply

Library Services Provided to the Law Review

While the library tries to provide as much assistance as possible to the Journal, it is important to realize that in most respects individual Journal Members are accorded the same professional service extended to all members of the student body.

This means that when you are working on your own Note, Comment or Book Review, you are subject to the same rules and regulations as any student would be when working on a paper or research project.

Also, even when you are working on a project for the Law Review, cite-checking is the most common example of this, individual members DO NOT have the authority to borrow items from the Mendik Library or, more importantly, request items through Inter-Library-Loan, on behalf of the Law Review

The policies set forth in this guide that relate specifically to members of the Law Review have been agreed to by the Library and the Law Review; and, for the most part, were created to protect the individual Member from personal liability for items borrowed or requested on behalf of the Law Review.

Assistance and Training

The library staff is eager to assist Law Review members in any way we can. Special Bloomberg Law, Lexis-Nexis, Westlaw, etc. training sessions, given by reference librarians, can be provided for Law Review members. Lectures and presentations on research methods in virtually any subject area can also be arranged. For general help with research questions, contact Michael McCarthy, Head of Reference Services & Professor of Legal Research  (michael.mccarthy@nyls.edu).